Shining bright: Kimberley Starr

I really wanted to consider how much we can rely on other people, and how self-interest can be a corrupting influence. But there were other things I was wondering about as well and I think those wonderings worked their way into the mysteries in the plot. For instance, living as a colonising people, what should our relationship be to the land that we only claim to own because our ancestors stole it?

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The sleuthing life: Kelli Hawkins

I’ve learned to keep going and get the words down, even when I feel under the pump, knowing I can always come back and edit later. And I’ve learned that research can be a rabbit hole! I spent days reading about witness protection in the UK, first-hand accounts of it, legislation, and how it works. It was fascinating though.

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The Nurse as Sleuth: Lyn McFarlane

The original inspiration for The Scarlet Cross came from my sister, who is an avid crime reader and a former psychiatric nurse. She was the one who suggested a hospital as the setting for a crime novel and I heartily agreed: the caregivers in a hospital are often at the coal face of crime, especially in the emergency department.

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Crazy capers: Kellie McCourt

For me, Indigo is Batman in Chanel. Like Batman, her superpower is that she’s ridiculously rich. However, unlike Batman, she doesn’t go looking for crime to fight, rather crime comes looking to pick a fight with her.

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Women crime writers in 21st-century Italy: Mirna Cicioni

There are two main differences between Italian and Australian women’s crime fiction. In Italian texts, murders are mostly motivated by jealousy or greed, and on the whole, there is less emphasis on family violence and on rape than in Australian fiction. The other noticeable difference is the emphasis on linguistic and cultural identity in the various Italian regions.

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