The Scarlet Stilettos are something else: Kelly Gardiner

Last year, I was house-hunting. I looked at a million houses and most of them were too small or pretty grotty. Then I looked at one house – also small and slightly grotty – and in the current tenants’ study there was a Scarlet Stiletto certificate on the wall. I resisted the temptation to read …

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The Extraordinary in the Ordinary: Kylie Kaden

While I’ve been a little unfaithful (more than once), it’s fair to say that I’m in a committed relationship with crime. Crime novels, that is. The signs that I’d be a crime buff were there since adolescence. When my friends were off reading Babysitters’ Club, I preferred the company of Dr Kay Scarpetta. What’s not …

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“I Like My Subjects Dead”: Joanne Drayton

The biographer and the detective are not as far apart as you might imagine. This analogy has been made before, and there are much less generous ones. Famously, commentator, Janet Malcolm, likened the biographer to an ‘eavesdropper’, a ‘voyeur’, a ‘snoop’. Some times what I do feels uneasily close to these transgressive manifestations. Not literally, …

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The virtues of “bum glue”: Carmel Reilly

I’m a children’s educational writer by trade, but recently I’ve just released a crime-ish adult book, Life Before. People ask me how the two types of writing mesh together? Has being an educational writer been a help or a hindrance to writing for adults? My answer to that is that my background is probably more …

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The Research Rabbit Hole: Samantha Battams

Some would say it’s because I’m a Gemini, but I have the habit of doing two projects at once aside from my regular career. True to form, this year I will have my first two books published: a true crime tale, The Secret Art of Poisoning and The Red Devil (written with Les Parsons). Researching …

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Toni Jordan headshot

Crime and romance with Jane Austen: Toni Jordan

‘You’re in love with love,’ my mother told me once. I must have been all of fourteen: flat-chested, grinning in shiny braces, complete with frightening, jutting headgear I wore at night. I went to girls’ school and I had no brothers. No men in the house at all. When my mother said that, about being …

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A mug’s game? Janice Simpson on the profession of writing

A Body of Work, my second crime novel, is a police procedural with social twists, although there is scant in-depth detail about police methods. Rather, the novel focuses on the interactions of the people in the investigating team. Social themes explored include secret adoption as a way of dealing with an unwanted pregnancy; the personal …

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